News Bits

And then there was this …

Canada On May 9, the Canadian Pediatric Society (CPS) issued a paper calling for “Universal access to no-cost contraception for youth in Canada.” Claiming “access to contraception” is a “basic human right,” the CPS pointed to estimates that there are nearly 60,000 unintended pregnancies among women 25 and under in Canada and claimed that preventing those pregnancies would save money even after accounting for the $157 million price-tag of universal contraception for kids. CPS said that there would be ... (Continue reading)

Tagged with:             

And then there was this …

Canada Conservative MP David Anderson (Cypress Hills-Grassland) introduced a bill that would make it a crime to intimidate health care workers to force them to directly or indirectly take part in euthanasia. The Protection of Freedom of Conscience Act, or Bill C-418, is expected to be debated in Parliament May 29, and Campaign Life Coalition is asking Canadians to get behind the private member’s bill that was tabled by Anderson last fall. If passed, C-418 would also make it ... (Continue reading)

And then there was this …

Canada LifeSiteNews has launched a petition to mark 2019 World Down Syndrome Day, to request that the United Nations help stop the abortion of Down syndrome babies. LifeSiteNews notes that 92 per cent of Down syndrome babies are aborted in the U.S., 98 per cent are aborted in Denmark and almost 100 per cent are aborted in Iceland. The comparable number in Canada is around 85 per cent. Aborting pre-born Down syndrome babies is the targeting of a particular ... (Continue reading)

And then there was this …

Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is at it again. He is giving $30 million Canadian tax dollars over the next five years to developing countries to push his homosexual and gender identity agenda. Global Affairs Canada, through Minister of International Development Marie-Claude Bibeau, said Canada “is committed to advocating for the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, two-spirited (LGBTQ2) and intersex persons and partnering with LGBTQ2 communities to address the barriers to equality that continue to limit ... (Continue reading)

And then there was this …

Canada By a 1996 agreement, St. Martha’s Catholic Hospital in Antigonish, N.S., was taken over by the Eastern Regional Health Board, but continued to be staffed by the Sisters of St. Martha. The sisters, the board, and the N.S. Health Department signed an agreement to ensure the hospital’s Catholic identity and values would be preserved. The agreement expressly forbids “assisting” suicide and abortion at St. Martha’s. The agreement also forbids any assessment of a patient ... (Continue reading)

And then there was this …

Canada The BBC World News reported that, “Canada has become a hot destination for parents-to-be looking for ‘altruistic surrogates’ – women who give birth to babies they are not genetically related to.” Canadian legislation makes it easy for “intended” parents to obtain legal parenthood of a surrogate baby. Canadian fertility consulting agencies match up couples (usually infertile couples, same-sex male couples and singles) wanting a child, with a woman who will carry a fertilized egg (not her own) to ... (Continue reading)

And then there was this …

Canada Canadian International Development Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau told a family planning conference in Kigali, Rwanda, that developing countries, especially in Africa, must do more to offer “family planning services” including contraception and abortion, in order to combat poverty. The Trudeau government maintains that breaking down “barriers” are necessary for “women and girls to develop their full potential.” She complained that while some countries’ delegates will talk about contraception and abortion at conferences they do not follow-up ... (Continue reading)

And then there was this …

Canada Canada’s Supreme Court authorised the practice of euthanasia, or medical-assistance-in-dying, in 2016 with the following exceptions forbidden by law: euthanasia for “mature minors,” i.e. those under the age of 18; psychiatric patients; and those whose illness falls beyond the ability of capacity to make an informed decision (for example, those suffering from Alzheimer’s disease). The Trudeau government tasked the Council of Canadian Academies to look into these three contentious exceptions and report to Parliament by the end of ... (Continue reading)

And then there was this …

Canada Doug Ford, Ontario’s new Progressive Conservative Premier has announced that the province’s colleges and universities have until January 2019 to have in place a free-speech policy or face funding cuts. “Colleges and universities should be places where students exchange different ideas and opinions in open and respectful debate,” he stated. The Canadian Federation of Students slammed the move as “an unprecedented overstep” by the government into campus activities, ignoring the fact that many students have been shut out ... (Continue reading)

And then there was this …

Canada The Canadian Paediatric Society is recommending that teen girls use intra-uterine devices (IUDs) as their first choice of artificial birth control. In an article in the May 31 National Post, the Society waxed eloquent on the positive aspects of IUDs, while playing down any negative effects. But what truly stands out is the inability or unwillingness of the Society to urge young girls to refrain from sexual intimacy at all, and rather develop healthy relationships of a non-intimate ... (Continue reading)

And then there was this …

Canada Police in Vancouver are describing the crime as a “double shooting” after a 23-year-old man shot a pregnant 31-year-old woman. The woman lost the baby but she is expected to survive the shooting. Under Canadian law, police cannot charge the assailant for killing a preborn child as a baby is not a victim of a crime until after it is born. This raises the question of how it can be a double shooting? The investigation is on-going. While pro-life ... (Continue reading)

World Briefs

International Australian euthanasia advocate Philip Nitschke has created a suicide machine that can be manufactured on so-called 3D printers. The “Sarco” – short for sarcophagus – is a detachable coffin with a nitrogen container and it is designed to “provide people with a death when they wish to die” the euthanasia doctor told the Agence-France Presse. Nitschke said he has provided safeguards including having a psychological test to ensure purchasers were sane and then they would be sent an ... (Continue reading)

US Briefs

United States The U.S. records almost 45,000 deaths by suicide each year, seven out of ten by white males. This does not include the so-called “slow suicides” from prescription-drug overdose, alcohol-related alcohol liver failure, and road accidents linked to alcohol abuse, again prevalent among American white males. In contrast, Germany, the U.K., France and Sweden show holding steady or declining statistics. Princeton researchers call these “deaths of despair,” and trace the causes to various social ... (Continue reading)

And then there was this …

Canada Wesley Smith, special consultant to the Center for Bioethics and Culture and a bioethics attorney, has reported that the College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia has rendered an opinion that one can qualify to be killed legally by a doctor by “starving oneself into an irremediable medical condition,” or VSED (voluntary stop eating and drinking). In order to hasten the procedure along, a doctor could simply “palliate the symptoms of starvation and dehydration to assist the ... (Continue reading)

And then there was this

Editor’s Note: We are experimenting with a new feature this month. “And then there was this,” near the back of the newspaper will replace “Bits ‘n’ pieces.” The idea is to cover news from Canada and abroad in brief, but the tone will change to add more of an editorial slant rather than straight news items. The section will be written by editor Paul Tuns and editorial board member Janice Glover. We welcome your feedback. The Council of Canadian Academics and ... (Continue reading)