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The problem with pro-abortion philosophy

The problem with  pro-abortion philosophy

Talk Turkey Josie Luetke In a YouTube video published on July 25, as part of a series called “Philosophy Time,” featuring actor James Franco and his friend Eliot Michaelson, Princeton University philosophy professor Liz Harman tries to justify the view that early-stage abortions are morally neutral. Her argument, in a nutshell, is this: If a fetus does not have moral status, it is not wrong to abort it. ... (Continue reading)

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‘Safety and security’

Law Matters John Carpay In Canada today, if you want to shut down the conference, rally or speaking engagement of someone whose opinion you disagree with, all you need to do to is accuse your opponent of being far right, racist, fascist, white supremacist, Islamophobic, or homophobic. The accusations need not be true, as long as they are shocking and loathsome. Hurling these kinds of accusations will ... (Continue reading)

Futile care

Futile care

In Extreme Measures: Finding a Better Path to the End of Life, Jessica Nutik Zitter, a Montreal-born physician and specialist in critical care medicine, gives a graphic insider’s account of how well-meaning critical care specialists like herself are all-too-apt to inflict futile, unnecessary and agonizing suffering upon dying patients in an intensive-care unit (ICU). To begin with, Zitter describes her first attempt as a medical student to resuscitate a dying ... (Continue reading)

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Overselling the creative class

Overselling the creative class

In 2002, Richard Florida published his book The Rise of the Creative Class and made a career for himself as an urban theorist, traveling the world lecturing and advising on how struggling, economically challenged cities could revive themselves. His “creative class” – a loose coalition that included artists, tech workers, academics and, interestingly, gay men and women – were rebuilding decimated downtown neighbourhoods and could do the same almost ... (Continue reading)

Going to pot

Light is Right Joe Campbell Oh, I know it can be addictive, especially if you start using it in your teens. But it’s also medicinal. Among other benefits, a compound it contains may reduce anxiety, ease symptoms of schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease, and prevent weight gain. Nevertheless, it’s still under a stigma. I’m not talking about marijuana. I’m talking about tobacco. After learning of its healing properties ... (Continue reading)

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Dunkirk highlights today’s social divisions

Dunkirk highlights today’s social divisions

In a summer of box office disappointments, Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk was an unexpected hit, since nobody thought that an epic film about the evacuation of British troops from Europe in the early days of World War II would be much more than a money-losing Oscar contender, meant to open deep in autumn. This would be the popular image of what was known as the “miracle of Dunkirk,” where the line between soldiers and citizens was erased just before the nation would ... (Continue reading)

Freedom of association includes the right to expel

Law Matters John Carpay In a free country, should a religious group be able to determine its own membership criteria? Or should judges have the power to impose their opinions about whether someone meets religious requirements? The Supreme Court of Canada will soon consider this question, raised by Randy Wall, who challenged his expulsion from a Calgary congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses. Wall became a Jehovah’s Witness (JW) in 1980, ... (Continue reading)

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Settled sense

Light is Right Joe Campbell I don’t agree with settled science. But I’m not entirely disagreeable. I do agree with settled sense. Settled science is unscientific, as new experiments commonly falsify old conclusions. Even children learn that unless a hypothesis is falsifiable, it’s not scientific. I thought everyone knew that all scientific theories, from macroevolution to global warming, are provisional. If they weren’t, we might still cling to ... (Continue reading)

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Book on American courts misses mark

National Affairs Rory Leishman In a widely acclaimed new book, Sex and the Constitution, Geoffrey R. Stone, former dean of law at the University of Chicago, commends the Supreme Court of the United States for revising the laws and the Constitution to conform with contemporary values. Laurence H. Tribe, professor of law at Harvard University, lauds Sex and the Constitution as a “masterpiece” and a “magisterial font of ... (Continue reading)

Nova Scotia to look at easing abortion access

Nova Scotia to look  at easing abortion access

Talk Turkey Josie Luetke The Canadian Press recently highlighted the story of a single Nova Scotia woman who was enraged with having to undergo several blood tests and an ultra sound before being referred for a surgical abortion. In this women’s case, the process to obtain her abortion took about two months. Abortion advocates say Nova Scotia is the only province in Canada with these referral practices, ... (Continue reading)

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1975 summer blockbuster about corrupt man, not nature

1975 summer blockbuster about corrupt man, not nature

The arrival of the first warm days brings with it the summer blockbuster, a seasonal indicator as venerable as crowded cottage weekends, sandy beach towels, the chemical cocktail of bug spray and sunscreen and the smell of gas generator exhaust and cotton candy at a fairground. The summer blockbuster has been declining with the general fortunes of Hollywood lately – this summer is predicted to be down by at least 10 per cent, thanks to early flops like King Arthur ... (Continue reading)

Advice for Christians

Rory Leishman As recently as 50 years ago, it was still a serious criminal offence punishable by up to life in prison for anyone in Britain, Canada or the United States to commit an abortion. And much the same was true everywhere else in Western Europe where stringent laws protected human life in the womb Today, of course, that is no longer the case: Over the past few decades, every ... (Continue reading)

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Social justice warriors

Law Matters John Carpay I’m only 49, but I remember when socialists still respected religious freedom, free speech, and freedom of association. I remember when the Left, advancing its case for bigger government and the forced redistribution of income, appealed to facts and logic. The Left opposed economic liberty, and while that is no small thing, the Left was otherwise sympathetic to the free society. I thought ... (Continue reading)

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Naming or shaming

Medical matters confuse me. Among the most confusing are diseases with patients’ or doctors’ names. I didn’t know what to think when neurologists said that Lou Gehrig might not have had Lou Gehrig’s disease. I thought the disease belonged to him. Apparently it didn’t. It may belong to someone else. I don’t know who. I don’t even know whom. Maybe only medical names should identify diseases. It would be less confusing. The medical name for Lou Gehrig’s disease is – or ... (Continue reading)

Baby Boomers caused great harm

Baby Boomers caused great harm

Just at the zenith of their political, cultural and social influence, it has become fashionable to turn a corrosive eye on the Baby Boomers, that huge generational cohort born somewhere between the final years of the Second World War and the beginning of Beatlemania outside of Britain. Keep in mind that very little of this is self-critical; the generation preceding the Boomers is far too old and diminished to ... (Continue reading)

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