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Freedom of conscience in the culture of death

Freedom of conscience in the culture of death

On Jan. 30, the Ottawa Citizen reported that three local family physicians were refusing to prescribe birth control pills. Not so long ago, the great majority of Canadians would have responded with an amazed: “So what?” Not so the anonymous woman who brought this story to public attention. She was incensed when, in response to her request for a birth control prescription at an Ottawa medical clinic, she was given ... (Continue reading)

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Religious freedom at stake in Loyola case

Arguments have begun in what, for faithful Christians, is one of the most important cases ever to come before the Supreme Court of Canada: at issue, is the fundamental right of Canadians to have their children educated in accordance with the basic principles of Christian faith and morality. This matter has been brought before the Court by the relentlessly secular government of Quebec, which, in 2008, imposed a compulsory course in Ethics and Religious Culture (ERC) on every school, ... (Continue reading)

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Assault against the family

Michael Coren Journalist for Life Gay marriage was introduced into Britain, and it’s now been the law of the land for a year. A morbid anniversary of failure, a far from happy birthday. The Church of England has been placed in an incredibly difficult position, particularly because the Archbishop of Canterbury is an evangelical and has long been opposed to full same-sex marriage. The Muslim ... (Continue reading)

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The ultimate euphemism

Light is Right Joe Campbell “Yes,” Dingwall said, “I’m speaking out. I’ve reached the point where I can remain silent no longer.” I was taken aback. Dingwall is the last person I would have accused of not speaking out. “To preserve my sanity,” he said, “I have no choice but to admit that I’m abused.” “Abused?” I repeated, startled. “Not verbally, emotionally, psychologically, physically or sexually. I’m abused intellectually. ... (Continue reading)

Pay attention to the nutty professors

Pay attention to the nutty professors

John Maynard Keynes’ The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money drew little public attention when first published in 1936, but soon developed into the most influential economics treatise of the 20th century. Keynes was not surprised. As he pointed out: “The ideas of economists and political philosophers, both when they are right and when they are wrong, are more powerful than is commonly understood. Indeed the world is ruled ... (Continue reading)

The wonderful middlebrow of Monuments Men

The wonderful middlebrow of Monuments Men

Maybe it’s a good thing, but war movies aren’t anywhere near as popular as they used to be. There is, to be sure, no shortage of violent films doing decent box office, many set amidst vast wars fought in space, or in some wild reimagining of the distant, even mythological past. But dramas set during wars happening in recent memory are thin on the ground; on a scale of ... (Continue reading)

A difference of opinion is not hate speech

Michael Coren Journalist for Life To an intelligent, open-minded person who sincerely believes in pluralism the entire Phil Robertson, Duck Dynasty incident from December should have nothing at all to do with where one stands on gay issues or what one thinks of the man’s opinions, but whether we believe in freedom of speech or prefer intolerance, and censorship. Tragically, many people – especially those on ... (Continue reading)

Vested interests

Light is Right Joe Campbell “They considered the science settled,” Dingwall said. “On global warming?” I asked. “On global immobility,” he replied. “In the seventeenth century, influential academics insisted that the earth is the immovable centre of the universe and the sun orbits it. That’s why they rejected Galileo, who asserted the opposite.” “It sounds a lot like today,” I said, “when influential academics insist that, because of human ... (Continue reading)

The illusion of glamour

The illusion of glamour

Glamour is a misunderstood word, whose meaning – like similar superlatives such as elite, exclusive, luxury and unique – has been adulterated and weakened, mostly thanks to its overuse by marketers and the media. But unlike those other words, so beloved of lifestyle journalists, realtors and advertising copywriters, glamour is a word that can be evocative and even profound, as writer Virginia Postrel explains in her new book The ... (Continue reading)

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Name game

Light is Right Joe Campbell Yes, in answer to the musical question, I know what it means to miss New Orleans. In 1981, while holidaying there, I sat in on trumpet with two jazz bands at the Famous Door. Not simultaneously. Successively. Simultaneously would have been understandable, as no one knew what to expect from me. Successively was inexcusable, as everyone knew what to expect the second ... (Continue reading)

Consumerism produces a throwaway culture

Michael Coren Journalist for Life Not all pro-lifers are Catholics, but every Catholic worthy of the name should be pro-life. As such, what the Pope says and writes is extremely important for the pro-life community, and after Evangelii Gaudium or “The Joy of the Gospel,” was issued there was enough hysteria to fill a CBC show about the achievements of Henry Morgentaler! This papal statement was ... (Continue reading)

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Over-protective parenting not helping kids

Amusements Rick McGinnis Seven years ago, a New York City columnist named Lenore Skenazy wrote a column about letting her nine-year-old son Izzy take public transit home by himself. Within days, she was at the centre of a media furore that saw Lenore dubbed “World’s Worst Mom,” and found herself made a standard bearer for whatever pushback is happening against an increasingly supervised and circumscribed style of ... (Continue reading)

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Debating euthanasia

Debating euthanasia

It is difficult to imagine how a fair-minded reader of Debating Euthanasia could come to any conclusion but that Keown is right: euthanasia is an unmitigated evil that can never be justified. Emily Jackson and John Keown are two of the foremost experts on the law as it relates to euthanasia in Britain and the United States. Together, they have written a most informative book, Debating Euthanasia, (Hart Publishing, 2011) in which ... (Continue reading)

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Moral issues and The Future of Catholicism

Moral issues and The Future of Catholicism

In my new book The Future of Catholicism (Signal Books/Random House) I devote the longest chapter to the issue of same-sex marriage, and other chapters to abortion, euthanasia, and contraception. But, some critics have argued, why spend so much time on these issues when the book is about the future of the Catholic Church? Simple. Because this is precisely the future of the Church. I discuss at some length ... (Continue reading)

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Pro-abortion article inadvertently shows dark side of abortion

Pro-abortion article inadvertently shows  dark side of abortion

The cover of a recent New York magazine promised so much – far more than I knew it would deliver, but I couldn’t resist. “There are over a million terminated pregnancies in American every year,” it read, under the headline “My Abortion,” “yet few women will ever talk about their experience.” Living in a country where actually talking about abortion is discouraged by governments, regardless of their politics, who seem ... (Continue reading)

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