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Whatever happened to Peggy’s baby in Mad Men?

Whatever happened to Peggy’s baby in Mad Men?

Rick McGinnis wonders whatever happened to Peggy Olson's baby. By the time you read this the last episode of Mad Men will be about to air, and since it’s unlikely that that last hour will satisfy everyone that’s followed the show for eight years, there might be some shouting. The series finale probably won’t be the Shakespearean tragedy that concluded Breaking Bad ... (Continue reading)

Michael Coren and The Interim

Over the past 10 months, many readers have wrote, emailed, and called to complain about Michael Coren. It should be noted that these complaints were never about something he wrote in The Interim. But his columns elsewhere and on-air commentary sometimes rubbed readers the wrong way when he differed with this paper’s editorial line. He took a different approach on homosexuality, pro-life tactics, and sex-ed than we do here ... (Continue reading)

Indigestible

Light is Right Joe Campbell I’m a victim of textual harassment. Texts that pressure me to buy, subscribe, donate, bequeath, support, upgrade, downsize, respond and beware invade my snail and electronic mail boxes daily. Not only do they pressure me to change my life. They hassle me to plan my death. It’s more than I can stand, especially as radio and TV hucksters harass me ... (Continue reading)

Sun News Network, RIP

Michael Coren It seems a little late to be writing about the closure of the Sun News network. It was back in February – Friday the 13th of all dates actually – and it now seems very far away. It’s always the way with a major news event I suppose. Initially there is surprise but mingled with the shock is a sense of liberation and newness; then a firestorm ... (Continue reading)

Gairdner on liberals vs. conservatives

Gairdner on liberals vs. conservatives

William D. Gairdner, prolific author of The War on the Family, The Trouble with Canada, and several other penetrating publications, is one of the most influential conservative intellectuals in North America. In his latest book, The Great Divide: Why Liberals and Conservatives will Never, Ever Agree,  he explains how the ideological divide between left- and right-wingers in Canada, the United States, and elsewhere in the Western world has developed into an acrimonious ... (Continue reading)

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Activist judges strike down ban on assisted suicide

National Affairs Rory Leishman With the precedent-shattering ruling in Carter v. Canada on Feb. 6, nine robed dictators on the Supreme Court of Canada not only struck down the longstanding ban on physician-assisted suicide in the Criminal Code: they also delivered a lethal blow to democracy and the rule of law in Canada. Consider the evidence: Gloria Taylor, the now deceased person who initiated the Carter case, was ... (Continue reading)

Prayer too important to be mere lip service

Michael Coren Journalist for Life Whether we like it or not, there are no magic words that we have to utter but there are sacred deeds that we need to perform. Like it or not there are no crucial statements in life but there are essential actions for those who live it. I refer to the immensely holy tempest in a small municipal teapot that ... (Continue reading)

Death wish

“Fear not,” Dingwall said, when I complained about the Supreme Court’s invalidation of the law against physician-assisted suicide. “What do you mean ‘fear not’?” I replied. “The learned judges are turning compliant doctors into legally approved merchants of death.” “They turned into that when the unlearned politicians legalized limited abortion and the Supreme Court removed the limits.” “In both cases,” I conceded, “the Court ruled that the existing laws violated the right to life, liberty and security of the person. However, by doubling ... (Continue reading)

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The pornification of Hollywood

The pornification of Hollywood

When Fifty Shades of Grey made the transition from best-selling novel to box office smash movie – on Valentine’s Day, no less – we were given another opportunity to watch the border between the mainstream movie industry and its pornographic cousin evaporate into further irrelevance. For anyone living in blissful isolation for the last couple of years, Fifty Shades began life as the first part of a trilogy written by ... (Continue reading)

A gas for all seasons

Light is Right Joe Campbell As I used to compose them, headlines rarely excite me. Recently, though, I read one that did. It said Climate change could be the cause of record cold. I was excited because my meteorological mentors also call climate change global warming. As both labels contain the same number of letters, the headline writer might as easily have typed Global warming could be the cause of ... (Continue reading)

Being pro-life means being against torture

Michael Coren Journalist for Life Supporting and fighting for life is a broad and deep ambition. It necessitates, surely, a love and defence for all life at all stages and for all people. Our opponents claim that we are single-issue obsessives; let us show them that they are totally wrong. Which is how I justify what is I suppose a rather different column. In the closing weeks ... (Continue reading)

Charlie Hebdo and Pope Francis

Charlie Hebdo and Pope Francis

The slaughter of the cartoonists and staff of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo by Islamic terrorists last month forced us to define precisely what we mean by “freedom of speech.” This was long overdue, and judging by some of the attempts made in the weeks after the murders, it would seem we have a long way to go. As everyone must be aware by now, Charlie Hebdo specialized in ... (Continue reading)

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Canadian Supreme Court ignores Parliament in doctor-assisted suicide ruling

With the precedent-shattering ruling in Carter v. Canada on Feb. 6, nine robed dictators on the Supreme Court of Canada not only struck down the longstanding ban on physician-assisted suicide in the Criminal Code: They also delivered a lethal blow to democracy and the rule of law in Canada. Consider the evidence: Gloria Taylor, the now deceased person who initiated the Carter case, was tragically afflicted with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the same progressive, incurable, paralysing disease that afflicted Sue Rodriguez, the principal in , Rodriguez v. ... (Continue reading)

Euthanasia’s slippery slope

Euthanasia’s slippery slope

In “End of Life Decision Making,” a report issued in 2011, a so-called “expert panel” appointed by the Royal Society of Canada assured Canadians: “The evidence does not support claims that decriminalizing voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide poses a threat to vulnerable people, or that decriminalization will lead us down a slippery slope from assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia to non-voluntary or involuntary euthanasia.” That statement is plainly wrong. For ... (Continue reading)

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Being Mortal is mostly good, except for egregious euthanasia error

Being Mortal is mostly good, except for egregious euthanasia error

Dr. Atul Gawande is a renowned surgeon, public-health researcher and medical professor at Harvard. His latest book, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End, contains many valuable suggestions for improving the care and treatment of terminally ill patients nearing the end of life. To begin with, Gawande notes that as recently as 1945, most deaths in the United States, Canada, and other industrialized countries occurred at home. Today, most ... (Continue reading)

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