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Being Mortal is mostly good, except for egregious euthanasia error

Being Mortal is mostly good, except for egregious euthanasia error

Dr. Atul Gawande is a renowned surgeon, public-health researcher and medical professor at Harvard. His latest book, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End, contains many valuable suggestions for improving the care and treatment of terminally ill patients nearing the end of life. To begin with, Gawande notes that as recently as 1945, most deaths in the United States, Canada, and other industrialized countries occurred at home. Today, most ... (Continue reading)

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A fate worse than death

I’ve always known that our situation is risky. I thought, though, that risk was about the chances of suffering ill fortune, like dying unexpectedly. It didn’t occur to me that it might be about the chances of enjoying good fortune, like escaping death unexpectedly. Risk is the downside of chance, not the upside, or so I assumed. My insurers gave me no reason to think otherwise. Their life insurance isn’t against life. It’s against death. Their home insurance isn’t against homes. ... (Continue reading)

Elite ideology as class warfare

Elite ideology as class warfare

I blame Karl Marx for a lot of things, but after inspiring some of the most destructive and blood-thirsty governments in modern history, his most abidingly destructive legacy is hobbling our understanding of the word “class.” For as long as I’ve been alive, when almost anyone talks about the class system they end up invoking images frozen somewhere in the middle of the European 19th century. Arrogant entitled aristocrats and heartless mill owners; upright bourgeois, dispirited workers and peasants. It’s a ... (Continue reading)

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Transgendered children? I think not

Michael Coren Journalist for Life I can’t pretend to understand transsexuals and those who believe they are born into the wrong gender but I don’t have the right to tell people how to behave and what to do with their own bodies once they reach the age of maturity, as long as they spend their own money on any surgery they request and do not break ... (Continue reading)

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New but not nice

T hey say that computers are becoming more like us. I don’t care if they are as long as we don’t become more like them. I wouldn’t want us to treat our elders the way computers treat theirs. Why, new computers are so full of themselves they want nothing to do with the old ones and eventually don’t even communicate with them. I know, because I’ve got an old computer and watching the new ones shun it ... (Continue reading)

Media elite unplugged

Media elite unplugged

Last month I wrote about the unease and apprehension that the internet and social media have inspired, within society and even in the precincts of Hollywood. The story so far is that, after marvelling at the massive new fortunes made by entities like Facebook and Twitter, we’ve begun worrying that moving parts of our social and emotional life online might not be healthy for us, and definitely won’t do ... (Continue reading)

Democracy and Christianity are compatible

National Affairs Rory Leishman Over the past 50 years in North America, faithful Christians – that is to say, those who look to Sacred Scripture as the ultimate authority on all questions of faith and morality – have endured one political calamity after another. In the United States, the process came to an early climax in 1973 with the calamitous decision of the United States Supreme Court in Roe ... (Continue reading)

Christian compassion

With all of the talk about the deadly Ebola virus I have been reminded about how pro-lifers and Catholics in particular were treated when we dared to criticize conventional wisdom about how to deal with AIDS and HIV. We are condemned because many in the pro-life community highlighted the dangers of condom use in Africa in the attempt to prevent AIDS and explained how the solution far more profound and complex. Some context first. AIDS had smashed its way through Africa ... (Continue reading)

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Social dysfunction

Social dysfunction

No one’s really sure who coined the term “social media,” but there’s a loose consensus that it came about almost 20 years ago, in and around AOL and the small but vital nexus of tech companies that were busy birthing the internet as we know it today. What no one seems to dispute is the idea that, with social media, something wholly new had been brought into the world, ... (Continue reading)

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The Left abandons traditional morality

The Left abandons traditional morality

National Affairs Rory Leishman Prior to the 1960s, the great majority of Canadians deplored the immorality of fornication, adultery and abortion. Tommy Douglas, founding leader of the New Democratic Party, was no exception. In his master’s thesis in sociology for McMaster University in 1933, he called for the sterilization of “mentally defective” women on the ground that they are prone to breed “sexually immoral girls” who are ... (Continue reading)

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The re-readable Mark Steyn

The re-readable Mark Steyn

Mark Steyn has been writing about the culture for more than a decade and a half, for National Review, the National Post, Maclean’s, The (London) Spectator, his own website (Steyn Online), and numerous other publications. Not a noted environmentalist, he recycles those columns, essays, and blogposts in a must-read collection, The documented Mark Steyn: Don’t Say You Weren’t Warned by Mark Steyn (Regnery, $34.49, 442 pages). And they are ... (Continue reading)

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The broken culture

Amusements Rick McGinnis Critics are used to playing Cassandra – lamenting the fallen state of the world and prophesying its woeful future, all while giving you the latest news on gross-out comedies, reality television or the state of young adult fiction. As such, you can be forgiven if the latest prediction of cultural calamity strikes you as more than one too many, inspiring more yawning than hand-wringing. That’s my ... (Continue reading)

Did Justin Trudeau get bad advice on abortion?

Michael Coren Journalist for Life I suppose we have to credit Justin Trudeau with determination: he is certainly sticking to his guns regarding the abortion issue, and has now said that a woman’s right to kill her unborn child is more important than the conscience rights of MPs when it comes to voting about abortion. He, of course, would never phrase it quite like that but ... (Continue reading)

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A coat hanger bill of rights

Light is Right Joe Campbell My plumber impressed me when he drove up in a box truck full of tools and spare parts. Although I had let my fixtures deteriorate significantly, resulting in leaky faucets, faulty flushing devices, clogged drains, and the like, he was ready for anything. Or so it seemed. After several hours of inspecting, repairing, and replacing, he took on a bathroom sink that ... (Continue reading)

In Carter Supreme Court should be bound by Rodriguez

In Carter Supreme Court should be bound by Rodriguez

Sue Rodriguez (left) and Lee Carter (right) In the 1993 Rodriguez case, the Supreme Court of Canada upheld the constitutional validity of the ban on assisted suicide in section 241(b) of the Criminal Code. Since then, advocates of so-called death with dignity have made several failed attempts to legalize assisted suicide by means of a private-member’s bill; most recently in 2010, when the bill was thoroughly ... (Continue reading)

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