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Dunkirk highlights today’s social divisions

Dunkirk highlights today’s social divisions

In a summer of box office disappointments, Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk was an unexpected hit, since nobody thought that an epic film about the evacuation of British troops from Europe in the early days of World War II would be much more than a money-losing Oscar contender, meant to open deep in autumn. This would be the popular image of what was known as the “miracle of Dunkirk,” where the line between soldiers and citizens was erased just before the nation would ... (Continue reading)

Freedom of association includes the right to expel

Law Matters John Carpay In a free country, should a religious group be able to determine its own membership criteria? Or should judges have the power to impose their opinions about whether someone meets religious requirements? The Supreme Court of Canada will soon consider this question, raised by Randy Wall, who challenged his expulsion from a Calgary congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses. Wall became a Jehovah’s Witness (JW) in 1980, ... (Continue reading)

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Settled sense

Light is Right Joe Campbell I don’t agree with settled science. But I’m not entirely disagreeable. I do agree with settled sense. Settled science is unscientific, as new experiments commonly falsify old conclusions. Even children learn that unless a hypothesis is falsifiable, it’s not scientific. I thought everyone knew that all scientific theories, from macroevolution to global warming, are provisional. If they weren’t, we might still cling to ... (Continue reading)

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Book on American courts misses mark

National Affairs Rory Leishman In a widely acclaimed new book, Sex and the Constitution, Geoffrey R. Stone, former dean of law at the University of Chicago, commends the Supreme Court of the United States for revising the laws and the Constitution to conform with contemporary values. Laurence H. Tribe, professor of law at Harvard University, lauds Sex and the Constitution as a “masterpiece” and a “magisterial font of ... (Continue reading)

1975 summer blockbuster about corrupt man, not nature

1975 summer blockbuster about corrupt man, not nature

The arrival of the first warm days brings with it the summer blockbuster, a seasonal indicator as venerable as crowded cottage weekends, sandy beach towels, the chemical cocktail of bug spray and sunscreen and the smell of gas generator exhaust and cotton candy at a fairground. The summer blockbuster has been declining with the general fortunes of Hollywood lately – this summer is predicted to be down by at least 10 per cent, thanks to early flops like King Arthur ... (Continue reading)

Advice for Christians

Rory Leishman As recently as 50 years ago, it was still a serious criminal offence punishable by up to life in prison for anyone in Britain, Canada or the United States to commit an abortion. And much the same was true everywhere else in Western Europe where stringent laws protected human life in the womb Today, of course, that is no longer the case: Over the past few decades, every ... (Continue reading)

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Social justice warriors

Law Matters John Carpay I’m only 49, but I remember when socialists still respected religious freedom, free speech, and freedom of association. I remember when the Left, advancing its case for bigger government and the forced redistribution of income, appealed to facts and logic. The Left opposed economic liberty, and while that is no small thing, the Left was otherwise sympathetic to the free society. I thought ... (Continue reading)

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Naming or shaming

Medical matters confuse me. Among the most confusing are diseases with patients’ or doctors’ names. I didn’t know what to think when neurologists said that Lou Gehrig might not have had Lou Gehrig’s disease. I thought the disease belonged to him. Apparently it didn’t. It may belong to someone else. I don’t know who. I don’t even know whom. Maybe only medical names should identify diseases. It would be less confusing. The medical name for Lou Gehrig’s disease is – or ... (Continue reading)

Baby Boomers caused great harm

Baby Boomers caused great harm

Just at the zenith of their political, cultural and social influence, it has become fashionable to turn a corrosive eye on the Baby Boomers, that huge generational cohort born somewhere between the final years of the Second World War and the beginning of Beatlemania outside of Britain. Keep in mind that very little of this is self-critical; the generation preceding the Boomers is far too old and diminished to ... (Continue reading)

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The disorder of Canada

The disorder of Canada

Light is Right Joe Campbell I’ve been wondering, of late, why congregants mark July 1 by singing “O Canada” at the end of Mass. I haven’t noticed legislators mark Dec. 25 by singing “O Little Town of Bethlehem” at the end of their proceedings. I realize the dates are not strictly comparable. Although Canada Day celebrates the birth of the State, Christmas day doesn’t celebrate the birth ... (Continue reading)

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Denying reality

Law Matters John Carpay Rachel Dolezal made headlines in 2015 after she was exposed as a white woman who had been representing herself as black for many years. Dolezal was removed as head of the Spokane chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, and kicked off a police ombudsman commission. She also lost her job teaching African studies at Eastern Washington University. Comparing ... (Continue reading)

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Brad Wall to invoke notwithstanding clause to restore democracy

Brad Wall to invoke notwithstanding clause to restore democracy

Thanks to judicial distortion of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms over the past 30 years, freedom of religion in Canada has come under such severe restriction that an otherwise law-abiding, and conscientious citizen could now lose his livelihood or even end up in jail simply for steadfastly upholding the traditional principles of Judeo-Christian morality. Faithful bakers, florists, printers and Christian organizations like the Knights of Columbus are well ... (Continue reading)

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Modern brownshirts are taking over Canada’s universities

Modern brownshirts are taking over Canada’s universities

Patrick Deane Patrick Deane, president of McMaster University in Hamilton, has joined other Canadian university presidents in silencing the debate of controversial ideas on campus. University of Toronto psychology professor Jordan Peterson was invited to speak at McMaster on March 17, about freedom of speech and political correctness. Peterson has gained national – and even international – notoriety for his principled philosophical rejection of his university’s edict to ... (Continue reading)

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Clashing symbols

Light is Right Joe Campbell I was surprised to learn that Canada has no official bird, fish, flower, fruit or mineral. Officially, our nation has only three: the maple tree, the beaver and the Canadian horse. Even Prince Edward Island, our smallest province, has four. The other provinces and territories have from three to eleven each. Nationally, the paucity of natural emblems is surprising enough. The tardiness ... (Continue reading)

Dismaying Dutch disregard for life

Dismaying Dutch disregard for life

Rory Leishman National Affairs How could the Netherlands, a country which heroically resisted the Nazi euthanasia program during the Second World War, now embrace one of the most extensive regimes of legalized euthanasia in the Western world? Most people in the Netherlands would resent such a question: They insist that there is no moral equivalence between the current Dutch model of voluntary euthanasia and the evil Nazi program, ... (Continue reading)

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