Articles from March, 2014

Page 1 of 212

Woman kept alive on life support to deliver unborn child

Woman kept alive on life support to deliver unborn child

Iver Benson was born two months after him mother was put on artificial respiration in order to save the unborn child's life. A pregnant woman from Victoria, B.C. who was declared “brain dead” was put on life support until the birth of her baby. In December, 32-year-old Robyn Benson ... (Continue reading)

Tagged with:

Bits & Pieces

Canada The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada and the Canadian Association of Radiologists both said an updated policy statement on ultrasounds is necessary with an eye to stop using the technology to determine the gender of the unborn child or for non-medical purposes. “This technology should not be used for the sole purpose of determining fetal gender without a medical indication for that scan,” the Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada concluded in a statement ... (Continue reading)

Girl Guides of Canada works with pro-abortion groups

As American pro-life activists lead a boycott campaign on the Girl Scouts, the Girl Guides of Canada has been caught partnering with and supporting organizations that actively promote contraception and abortion as empowering to girls. Promising to be “true to myself” and to “take action for a better world” Girl Guide members have been sent as youth representatives to pro-abortion conferences in the developing world and to a leadership training camp run by a pro-abortion-and-contraception organization. They have worked for organizations ... (Continue reading)

Tagged with:     

How Roe was decided

How Roe was decided

Abuse of Discretion: The Inside Story of Roe v. Wade by Clarke D. Forsythe (Encounter, $31, 477 pages) In Abuse of Discretion: The Inside Story of Roe v. Wade, Clarke D. Forsythe has written an insightful and original book on the infamous 1973 decision that legalized abortion in all nine months throughout the United States, and the lesser known companion decision Doe v. Bolton, which permitted abortion restrictions as long ... (Continue reading)

Tagged with:

The man who proved Malthus wrong born 100 years ago today

Agronomist Norman Borlaug was born 100 years ago today. I think he was one of the greatest human beings who ever lived, and because he did, millions of others who might have died due to starvation also lived. I wrote an article for The Interim about Borlaug when he died in 2009, entitled "Borlaug proved Malthus wrong." Here's a snippet: In 1968, Paul Ehrlich said in his best-selling apocalyptic book The Population Bomb that the world was headed toward a Malthusian ... (Continue reading)

Tagged with:     

Religious freedom at stake in Loyola case

Arguments have begun in what, for faithful Christians, is one of the most important cases ever to come before the Supreme Court of Canada: at issue, is the fundamental right of Canadians to have their children educated in accordance with the basic principles of Christian faith and morality. This matter has been brought before the Court by the relentlessly secular government of Quebec, which, in 2008, imposed a compulsory course in Ethics and Religious Culture (ERC) on every school, ... (Continue reading)

Tagged with:

Assault against the family

Michael Coren Journalist for Life Gay marriage was introduced into Britain, and it’s now been the law of the land for a year. A morbid anniversary of failure, a far from happy birthday. The Church of England has been placed in an incredibly difficult position, particularly because the Archbishop of Canterbury is an evangelical and has long been opposed to full same-sex marriage. The Muslim ... (Continue reading)

Tagged with:

The ultimate euphemism

Light is Right Joe Campbell “Yes,” Dingwall said, “I’m speaking out. I’ve reached the point where I can remain silent no longer.” I was taken aback. Dingwall is the last person I would have accused of not speaking out. “To preserve my sanity,” he said, “I have no choice but to admit that I’m abused.” “Abused?” I repeated, startled. “Not verbally, emotionally, psychologically, physically or sexually. I’m abused intellectually. ... (Continue reading)

Fr. Ted Colleton Scholarship winner

Fr. Ted Colleton Scholarship winner

Anselm Ragetli Editor’s Note: Anselm Ragetli is a student at St. Paul’s High School in Winnipeg. He finished first in the Fr. Ted Colleton Scholarship contest out of 69 entrants. The second and third place finishers will appear in a forthcoming edition of the paper. The Fr. Ted Colleton Scholarship is co-sponsored by The Interim and Niagara Region Right to Life.   Western Civilization is currently in a state of profound ... (Continue reading)

Tagged with:

Pay attention to the nutty professors

Pay attention to the nutty professors

John Maynard Keynes’ The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money drew little public attention when first published in 1936, but soon developed into the most influential economics treatise of the 20th century. Keynes was not surprised. As he pointed out: “The ideas of economists and political philosophers, both when they are right and when they are wrong, are more powerful than is commonly understood. Indeed the world is ruled ... (Continue reading)

The wonderful middlebrow of Monuments Men

The wonderful middlebrow of Monuments Men

Maybe it’s a good thing, but war movies aren’t anywhere near as popular as they used to be. There is, to be sure, no shortage of violent films doing decent box office, many set amidst vast wars fought in space, or in some wild reimagining of the distant, even mythological past. But dramas set during wars happening in recent memory are thin on the ground; on a scale of ... (Continue reading)

Dementia and public policy

The aging of Canada’s population and the significant burden posed by complex conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease, is leading to concern about the deficit in quality care to meet the needs of elderly patients. According to the Alzheimer Society of Canada, there are 103,000 new cases of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias diagnosed each year. There are 750,000 people living with some form of dementia and that number is expected to double by 2030. The annual cost of treating people ... (Continue reading)

Tagged with:

Downtown Abbey and abortion

At Public Discourse, Michael Stokes Paulsen, Professor of Law at the University of St. Thomas, in Minneapolis, and co-director of its Pro-Life Advocacy Center, discusses an abortion storyline from the British television program Downtown Abbey. There are spoilers in the article but Paulsen's piece illustrates the way in which art (television) can delve into serious topics such as abortion and shine a light on its realities: In the end, this Downton Abbey story line is neither overtly pro-life nor pro-choice but ... (Continue reading)

Tagged with:         

Vellacott introduces shared parenting motion

Vellacott introduces shared parenting motion

Maurice Vellacott Conservative MP Maurice Vellacott (Saskatoon-Wanuskewin) chose neither of his pro-life bills when it came time to table his private member’s business when the House resumed after its Christmas recess. On Jan. 31, Vellacott rose in the House to declare: “I have had a difficult decision to make. I have 4 items on the Order Paper, and all of them are of great importance. One is a ... (Continue reading)

Tagged with:

Bill 52 must be defeated

The Quebec National Assembly recessed on Feb. 20 and will not return until March 11. Bill 52, which would legalize euthanasia as “medical aid in dying” in the province, may not come for a vote if an expected provincial election is called before the legislature returns or if the minority Parti Quebecois government falls on the budget vote expected shortly after Members of the National Assembly return. With recent polls indicating a possible majority for the PQ in the next ... (Continue reading)

Tagged with:
Page 1 of 212
Copyright © 2018 The Interim. All rights reserved.   |   Developed by TrueMedia   |   Subscribe RSS