Articles from September, 1996

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Poland coming to terms with new abortion push

For quite a few years there has been in Poland a confrontation between the “civilization of life” and “civilization of death.” The enemies of our nation and of the Catholic Church try to force erroneous theories and stereotypes about family and society into the hearts and minds of Poles. The liberal and post-communist circles fight vigorously against pro-life and pro-family attitudes.  They try to frighten the nation into believing that too many births lead to economic difficulties, particularly in terms of ... (Continue reading)

New monument recalls aborted children

The middle-aged nursing instructor gently reached for my trembling hand. “Having an abortion isn’t such a big deal,” she said, her voice carrying the same reassuring tone that had gotten me through countless days and nights of gruelling study, exams and pre-dawn hospital shifts. She continued, “It’ll be over within five minutes and you’ll not have to deal with it (meaning my out-of-wedlock pregnancy) any more.” What a monstrous lie that was. First came the depression. A blackness that descends like a ... (Continue reading)

Service amid poverty a time to reflect

Sometime in May of this year, Father Joe Burg, ex Toronto, telephones me from Jamaica and asked me if I could take care of his parish there while he came to visit his family in Toronto. The dates he suggested were late June and into July. As schools here are closing or closed at that time. I was very glad to oblige. I arrived in Montego Bay airport on June 17 and was met by Father Joe. We literally “bounced” ... (Continue reading)

Coren’s latest welcome change from lib-left fare

Michael Coren’s latest book has predictably been trashed already by the pundits who populate what passes for the mainstream media these days – Toronto’s free weekly left-wing rag Eye, for example, suggested the book should have been entitled Getting It Right while the Toronto Star cited what it saw as Coren’s “terminal pomposity” in relaying the kudos of one of this readers who told him she relies on his writings as a voice of “sanity, morality, clarity, and wisdom.” Personal ... (Continue reading)

U.S. pro-life groups vow renewed battle against RU486 use

United States pro-life representatives are crying foul after the drug they are calling “the human pesticide” moved to within a step of official approval south of the border. The U.S Food and Drug Administration’s advisory committee on reproductive health drugs by a 6-0 vote (with two abstentions) decided July 19 that the benefits of the French-developed RU486 abortion pill, in combination with misoprostol, outweigh the risks and recommended that it be marketed. All that remains now is for the full FDA commission ... (Continue reading)

Amendment puts unborn in jeopardy

WARSAW – Protection for the unborn seems to be weakening in predominantly Catholic Poland. The country’s left-wing dominated parliament in late August moved a step closer to allowing abortion on demand. Despite strong opposition from Poland’s Catholic Church leaders, parliament kept alive a proposed law allowing women to obtain abortions up to the 12th week of pregnancy. It allows women to have an abortion if they decide they cannot afford to raise the child or are experiencing other personal problems. ... (Continue reading)

Student makes splash in Paralympics

While most of the country sat back and watched the exploits of Canadian athletes competing in the Atlanta Olympic Games, Marie Claire Ross of London, Ontario had training on her mind. The competitive swimmer is one of a host disabled athletes who took part in the Paralympic Games August 15-26 in Atlanta. From modest beginnings, the Paralympics have emerged to provide a competitive outlet for disabled athletes around the world. While they don’t rival the regular Olympics, these ... (Continue reading)

OSFL announces new executive team

Eighteen enthusiastic pro-life young people from across Ontario gathered for the Ontario Students for Life Leadership Retreat at the Manressa Retreat Centre in Pickering, August 2-4. The weekend began with ice-breaking activities. Followed by an exchange of ideas and pro-life strategies. In the later evening, young pro-lifers debated such issues as practises in various religions to initiating pro-life action in schools and local communities. Saturday, August 3 proved to be a long, but eventful day. Dorothy McElroy of “Communicate,” offered a workshop ... (Continue reading)

Concerns raised over U.N. food summit

The U.S. delegation to November’s United Nations world food summit is likely to promote “population stabilization” and “family planning” as a means of protecting world food security. According to a July 29 report from the CWN new service, the Clinton administration has circulated a position paper expressing support for population control measures. The U.S. position also calls on participating countries to adopt national policies favouring voluntary population stabilization. Pro-life and pro-family groups interpret population stabilization to mean the promotion of artificial means of ... (Continue reading)

Nurses fight participation in abortions

A group of nurses in Ontario is finding that the principle of choice doesn’t always work both ways on the abortion issue. The five nurses have filed a complaint with the Ontario Human Rights Commission on religious grounds after they were put in the position of having to participate in abortion procedures at Markham Stouffville hospital, just outside Toronto. One of them has filed a civil lawsuit claiming damages of almost $1 million against the hospital, alleging she was additionally ... (Continue reading)

Canadian law coming to terms with IVF research

Although there had been worldwide shock and dismay over the recent destruction in England of 3,300 (or more) abandoned embryos conceived through in-vitro fertilization (IVF), its pretty well open season on the tiny humans in Canada. There are currently no laws governing IVF in this country, thanks mainly to the reluctance of former federal Health Minister Diane Marleau to enact mandatory guidelines on new reproductive technologies. Her inaction came following the completion of a four-year, $28 million royal commission into ... (Continue reading)

Keeping pace with new reproductive realities

The destruction of human embryos in England can be seen as another case of reproductive technology outpacing the law. Research into in-vitro fertilization, while designed to help infertile couples, did not immediately take into account the moral and ethnical questions surrounding the treatment of “spare” embryos. Britain in fact, was a pioneering nation in the science of in-vitro fertilization, and perhaps it is no surprise that it is the first nation to have to deal with the large-scale destruction of ... (Continue reading)

Divergent views on treatment on embryos

Although the rate of conception is very high with in-vitro fertilization (IVF), successful embryo transfer (ET) and implantation is much more difficult and is usually the stage at which the procedure fails. A fertility clinic often speaks of its high pregnancy rate, which usually refers to the chemical pregnancy in the fist few days, but the implantation rate is much lower, miscarriages occur and the actual “take home baby rate is lower still. This is the rate the couple needs ... (Continue reading)

Embryo Destruction worse than feared?

On August 1st, in a move called “a pre-natural massacre” (Vatican’s newspaper L’Osservatore Romano) and “a new milestone for the culture of death” (Catholic World News), British scientists began the destruction of more than 3, 300 human embryos. An appeal was made to 900 couples whose frozen embryos were scheduled to be destroyed, when the five-year limit on their storage had run out. The embryos were the result of the test-tube baby treatment undertaken before August 1991, when the storage due ... (Continue reading)

Speaker turns mishap into new inspiration

Nine years ago in the car Adrian Dieleman was driving crashed, rolled over and severed his spinal cord, leaving him a quadriplegic at 22. “It was not an accident, it was a preventable injury” contends Dieleman. “Accident suggests fate or something irreversible but most injuries are preventable by someone involved.” The number one killer of people under 20 is injuries. Adrian Dieleman, now 31, has spoken to 15, 000 youth in the last year about his injury, partly as a Smartrisk ... (Continue reading)

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