Articles from March, 1995

Page 1 of 212

The Philippine experience

Talking about vaccines, does anyone recall the horrors of the Mexico and Philippine anti-tetanus vaccine campaigns? In October of 1994 Human Life International received a report from its Mexican branch “Comite Pro Vida di Mexico” on the anti-tetanus vaccine. About the same time, similar reports came from the Philippines via Sister Mary Pilar Verzosa, RGS, of Pro-Life Philippines, where 3.4 million women were vaccinated. The groups were concerned with the strange implementation of the vaccination program. Only women of childbearing age (12-49) ... (Continue reading)

Overriding parental consent

In December, 1992, the Ontario Legislature passed the Consent to Treatment Act and the Substitute Decision Act , both of which are now expected to be proclaimed in force on April 3, 1995.  In general terms, the CTA sets out the legal conditions under which “health practitioners” are permitted to administer “treatment” to patients.  HPs are prohibited from administering a proposed treatment unless they have formed the opinion that either (a) the patient is capable of giving, and ... (Continue reading)

Anti-people ideology dominates U.N. Copenhagen meeting

The World Summit on Social Development, held in Copenhagen in March, was supposed to offer solutions to poverty, unemployment and social disintegration.  Instead, the conference was hijacked by the population controllers who use every UN form to perpetuate their over-population myth.  Leading the assault on people on this occasion was the official Canadian delegation, which attempted to force underdeveloped countries to implement sweeping “health education” programs and services as a condition for receiving development aid. At press time, the summit had ... (Continue reading)

Gravy train on collision course

Quebec When federal Health Minister Diane Marleau announced last month that she will soon crack down on provinces that allow private clinics to extra-bill for medical services covered by Medicare, her threat was primarily aimed at Ralph Klein’s lean-and-mean Alberta. Canada’s abortion entrepreneurs quickly realized however, that they were likely to be swept up in Marleau’s attempt to clean out violators of the Canada Health Act.  According to Montreal’s The Gazette, a federal Health Department official claims at least five ... (Continue reading)

180 days of prayer

It has been well documented that women in China experience terrible persecution under the country’s forced-abortion policy. Now, one group is hoping that when the United Nations-sponsored Women’s Conference meets in Beijing in September, they will be able to “raise their voices in defence of their Chinese sisters.” On March 8, the International Coalition on the Family is calling for 180 days of prayer for the women of China leading up to the conference. “If our future hosts in Beijing want to hold ... (Continue reading)

Proving our peacefulness

Toronto Ten thousand Canadian dollars.  That’s a whole lot of money.  And it’s the amount which Campaign Life Coalition Toronto is willing to pay for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person responsible for the 1992 fire-bombing of the Morgentaler clinic. Some pro-life people have asked why a pro-life group would offer such a reward.  I certainly don’t speak for Campaign Life Coalition, but for my own money, I think the offer is just what the pro-life ... (Continue reading)

Notable Quotes

Evil “Indifference to evil strengthens evil.” Elie Wiesel, in an interview to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, (CBC’s Prime Time Magazine, January 25, 1995.) Stopping the plague “It’s a plague that exploits, degrades and inflicts violence on children, women, men and families.  It is an evil that contributes to the inter-related problems of sexual violence, child victimization, child prostitution and sexual exploitation.” From the first international conference on pornography “Protecting Our Children’s Future,” ... (Continue reading)

Rose & Thorn

Rose: Western Report, for its March 6 issue cover: Your health-care dollars don’t pay for vanity nose jobs, nor do they cover the cost of tummy tucks and liposuction.  If a man is sexually disoriented and wants to become a woman, he has to pay for it himself, and birth control is user pay too.  So why are we paying for abortion?” Thorn: Paul Martin and his Budget ’95 planners. While Canadians were asked to pay large increases at the gas ... (Continue reading)

UN: People are pollution

The Canadians went to Copenhagen and told the starving children in underdeveloped countries: “Take the Pill, then we fund clean-water systems for you to swallow it.” What a disgrace. UN bureaucrats are alarmed that the richer nations like Canada are cutting back on their foreign-aid dollars.  So they propose a levy on international transactions.  Just sit back and think about the kind of power an estimated U.S. $1.5 trillion annually gives to a handful of people. UN policies have long favoured such groups ... (Continue reading)

Halifax Rescue appeal

Three pro-life activists who were convicted of “public mischief” following the October 1992 “Cross of Hope Rescue” at the Morgentaler abortuary in Halifax have filed an appeal. Paul Cheverie and Ken Biso from Charlottetown, PEI and Ann Marie Tomlins of Borden, Ontario filed their notice of appeal on October 21 on the grounds that the presiding judge denied them their right to properly construct their defense; the sentence and conviction were severe and punitive; and there was undue delay in a ... (Continue reading)

Infighting threatens to split Planned Parenthood

The world’s largest abortion provider is worried that if it does not expand it might get “frozen right out of the system.” Founded in 1917 by Margaret Sanger, Planned Parenthood America has made millions of dollars by pushing its agenda of birth control and abortion. Now, however, the group has seen its fortunes threatened as many U.S. states are directing low-income, Medicaid patients toward lower-cost health-care operations.  Since the bulk of Planned Parenthood’s patients are derived from this low-income bracket, the organization ... (Continue reading)

Second euthanasia case hits N.S.

A second case of assisted  suicide is before the Nova Scotia courts.  It occurred in May 1994, a year after the Myers death, and has reached the preliminary inquiry stage. Thirty-five-year-old Brenda Ethel Barnes, a non-diabetic, died in hospital three days after receiving a dose of insulin.  Nurse Mary Jane Fogarty, 38, who calls herself Barnes’ best friend, is charged with providing the syringes and insulin, and writing the suicide note. Barnes, one of 11 children, was a hard worker ... (Continue reading)

Pro-lifers in cyberspace

In the last couple of months, I’ve been too busy to contribute to The Interim.  My excuse is that I bought a new computer to make my pro-life work more efficient.  If I were to admit exactly how many hours I’ve spent in front of a screen, wrestling to learn a new system, hook up a modem and step onto the so-called “information highway,” I would probably be advised to seek counseling.  But, all those countless hours later, I can ... (Continue reading)

Push to end tax-funded abortions

The province of Alberta has been hit with a wave of budget-cutting fever and a local group is attempting to ride this wave to remove abortion from the federal rolls. The Committee to End Tax-Funded Abortions, an Edmonton-based group, plans to organize a media and lobbying campaign to raise public awareness. “We are convinced that the majority of Albertans feel that abortions are not an essential service and that they should not have to pay for them,” said Committee director Patty ... (Continue reading)

No money for pro-life defendants

In a move which caught pro-lifer observers off-guard, a judge ruled that 16 of 18 pro-life activists who were named in an Ontario lawsuit will not receive legal expenses. With the exception of Erroll Alchim, Justice George Adams ruled that the 16 other defendants must cover their own legal expenses.  Jane Ubertino (also dropped from the suit), who was represented by Peter Lauwers, received her full costs. The early March ruling comes as a grave disappointment to both lawyers and leaders on ... (Continue reading)

Page 1 of 212
Copyright © 2018 The Interim. All rights reserved.   |   Developed by TrueMedia   |   Subscribe RSS